Below is some of the material which has been publish in recent times and which relate to Autotrakker and our currently available new solution for measuring BreakBulk Cargo at port terminals for the terminal operators - CMS.

2015 Online Article

cargo measurement

BreakBulk Online

October 19, 2015 Europe: Antwerp Euro Terminals, Autotrakker, cargo scanning, HLI Rail & Rigging, project cargo
Cargo Scanning System at Work in Antwerp
Antwerp Euro Terminals is the first terminal operator to offer Autotrakker Ltd.’s Cargo Measuring System (CMS), a fixed laser scanning system.
Ports, EPCs, carriers and other logistics companies are starting to add laser scanning devices to their toolboxes to help collect and share cargo volume measurements. Typically the measurement tools are hand-held or affixed to a stationary object such as a building.
The technology has been available for some time, but its application in measuring cargo volume is in its infancy. Project cargo supply chains stand to benefit.
Railroads are particularly interested in technology to improve the accuracy of their cargo measurements, said Raul Ortega, with Houston-based HLI Rail & Rigging and representing the Railway Industrial Clearance Association, speaking on the sidelines at Breakbulk Americas.
At ports, it is critical that cubic measurements be accurate in order to expedite throughput, and to load vessels and rolling assets safely and efficiently. Billing is sometimes based on cubic measure as well.
Traditional, manual cargo measurement is fraught with difficulty. Incorrect measurements can lead to incorrect billing, disputes, accidents, inefficient stowage, customer dissatisfaction, loss of revenue, vessel or other delays, and escalation of costs.
Mike Buchanan, with UK-based Autotrakker Ltd., developer of the CMS solution, said the system is unique in that it is based on a “scanning bay,” framed by multiple, expandable towers. The cargo can be driven into the bay, or the bay can be completely mobile and set up around the cargo. Eye-safe infrared scanners automatically measure dimensions then store the three-dimensional information to a database. The database may be linked to loading and costing systems, emailed to a client, or otherwise incorporated into terminal management. Total time to scan a roughly 60-foot object is two minutes, but the scanning time may be lengthened for enhanced accuracy.
Importantly, the CMS operates from -10 to +40 C, in heavy rain, and in conditions of ice and snow. It will measure ice and snow build-up, which also has implications for load management.
Expediting the measurement process is a key advantage of laser scanning. Terminal operators, carriers, and others may be particularly interested in solutions like CMS that can be accessed, manipulated (to, for example, separate out items on a single trailer), and linked to other data management platforms. The potential to provide supply chain visibility to customers is strong, and according to Buchanan, could offer terminal operators, carriers and others a logistical and marketing edge.

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Below is some of the material which has been publish in recent times and which relate to Autotrakker and our currently available new solution for measuring BreakBulk Cargo at port terminals for the terminal operators - CMS.

2015 Online Article

BreakBulk Online

October 19, 2015 EuropeAntwerp Euro TerminalsAutotrakkercargo scanningHLI Rail & Riggingproject cargoCargo Scanning System at Work in Antwerp

Cargo Scanning System at Work in Antwerp

Antwerp Euro Terminals is the first terminal operator to offer Autotrakker Ltd.’s Cargo Measuring System (CMS), a fixed laser scanning system.

Ports, EPCs, carriers and other logistics companies are starting to add laser scanning devices to their toolboxes to help collect and share cargo volume measurements. Typically the measurement tools are hand-held or affixed to a stationary object such as a building.

The technology has been available for some time, but its application in measuring cargo volume is in its infancy. Project cargo supply chains stand to benefit.

Railroads are particularly interested in technology to improve the accuracy of their cargo measurements, said Raul Ortega, with Houston-based HLI Rail & Rigging and representing the Railway Industrial Clearance Association, speaking on the sidelines at Breakbulk Americas.

At ports, it is critical that cubic measurements be accurate in order to expedite throughput, and to load vessels and rolling assets safely and efficiently. Billing is sometimes based on cubic measure as well.

Traditional, manual cargo measurement is fraught with difficulty. Incorrect measurements can lead to incorrect billing, disputes, accidents, inefficient stowage, customer dissatisfaction, loss of revenue, vessel or other delays, and escalation of costs.

Mike Buchanan, with UK-based Autotrakker Ltd., developer of the CMS solution, said the system is unique in that it is based on a “scanning bay,” framed by multiple, expandable towers. The cargo can be driven into the bay, or the bay can be completely mobile and set up around the cargo. Eye-safe infrared scanners automatically measure dimensions then store the three-dimensional information to a database. The database may be linked to loading and costing systems, emailed to a client, or otherwise incorporated into terminal management. Total time to scan a roughly 60-foot object is two minutes, but the scanning time may be lengthened for enhanced accuracy.

Importantly, the CMS operates from -10 to +40 C, in heavy rain, and in conditions of ice and snow. It will measure ice and snow build-up, which also has implications for load management.

Expediting the measurement process is a key advantage of laser scanning. Terminal operators, carriers, and others may be particularly interested in solutions like CMS that can be accessed, manipulated (to, for example, separate out items on a single trailer), and linked to other data management platforms. The potential to provide supply chain visibility to customers is strong, and according to Buchanan, could offer terminal operators, carriers and others a logistical and marketing edge.